Japanese Ginza shoppers tagged

January 10, 2007 at 3:42 pm Leave a comment

vert.ginza.shopping.gi.jpgJames (MindShare regional team, Singapore) writes:

In your Christmas drunken haze you may have missed this important CNN report from Japan:

Stores in central Tokyo are set to beam news of special offers, menus and coupons to passers-by in a trial run of a radio-tagging system.

The Tokyo Ubiquitous Network Project, which launches in the glitzy Ginza district next month, sends shoppers information from nearby shops via a network of radio-frequency identification tags, infrared and wireless transmitters, according to the project’s Web site.

Shoppers can either rent a prototype reader or get messages on their cell phones. The tags and transmitters identify a reader or phone’s location and match it to information provided by shops.

Apparently Ginza will be blanketed with 10,000 RFID tags. Am I the only one who thinks of that scene in Minority Report where Tom Cruise is chased by personal advertising throughout the airport/mall?

The trial will take place during January to March. Very keen to know the results. If it’s successful, we can be sure this will spread like wildfire across Asia…and the world.

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Entry filed under: japan, mobile, retail.

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